Langley doesn’t make excuses

Wyoming interim men’s basketball coach Fred Langley didn’t pull any punches after the Cowboys lost 85-58 to No. 9 San Diego State Tuesday night in the final home game of the season.

At the final media timeout of the first half UW trailed 28-20 with 3:36 to play. The Cowboys trailed 37-20 at halftime, and they made only three field goals over the final 17 minutes of the half.

“We faded, along with our intensity,” Langley said. “I was really disappointed in our effort. As coaches we didn’t push the right buttons tonight. The players didn’t respond to their teammates.”

Langley was asked if there is an illness going around the team. A couple of players on Twitter hinted at that earlier in the day.

“I told them (after the game) you let yourself down if you can’t perform your best,” he said. “You’ve got to get to the doctor and you’ve got to do the things you need to do. You let your teammates down and a you let the fans down. There is no excuses. You’re going to sniffle and you’re going to tough it out.”

Langley said the offense dictated the defense, which is something he doesn’t want to see happen. UW made only 2 of 16 3s and couldn’t do anything inside agaisnt SDSU’s big and athletic frontcourt. SDSU was outscored 52-32 in the paint.

The 27-point win was the most by SDSU in a MWC road game in school history.

Langley went with a bigger lineup by not starting junior point guard JayDee Luster. He went with junior center Adam Waddell, sophomore forward Amath M’Baye and senior forward Djibril Thiam all between 6-9 and 6-10. It worked for about three-quarters of the first half, but UW was still outrebounded 43-26.

“It’s not an excuse to put a product like that on the floor for the fans,” Langely added. “It was hard to be a Cowboy player tonight. It was hard to be a Cowboy fan tonight. It was hard to be a Cowboy coach tonight. It was just a tough night. I can’t put my finger on it, but we’ve got to fix it.”

In his last home game Thiam had 13 points and two rebounds.

UW plays at No. 3 BYU Saturday. The Cowboys have lost 21 straight road games going back to more than two years. However, BYU suffered a blow today when sophomore forward Brandon Davies was dismissed from the team for a violation of the school’s honor code.

“Wow. He’s a big-time player,” SDSU senior forward Malcolm Thomas said. “Without him they’re still a good team and can still make a run. I don’t know what to say to that. I didn’t know that.”

Added Langley, who heard about Davies before the game: “I’m sure they’ll miss him, but they have a lot of depth as well.”

Schroyer talks San Diego State

Talked with Wyoming men’s basketball coach Heath Schroyer for about 10 minutes this morning about the Cowboys’ game Saturday at No. 4 San Diego State, and the Aztecs’ 71-58 loss at No. 9 Brigham Young Wednesday night in Provo.

I don’t know about you, but that was a heckuva game.

Schroyer said SDSU has an “NBA-type front line” with the likes of sophomore Kawhi Leonard, seniors Malcolm Thomas and Billy White and junior Brian Carlwell.

“This is the best team the Aztecs have ever put out on the floor,” Schroyer added.

Despite the loss Schroyer was impressed with SDSU’s defense and it held BYU to 14 points below its scoring average, despite 43 points from senior guard Jimmer Fredette.

When asked about Fredette, the nation’s leading scorer and who comes to Laramie Wednesday to play the Pokes, Schroyer said: “Jimmer’s one of those guys that comes around once every so often. I think he’s the best player in college basketball.”

Schroyer said his team needs to rebound the ball better after UW was outrebounded 40-26 in its 74-65 home loss to UNLV Tuesday. Schroyer said his guards need to be more involved in rebounding.

Schroyer liked the minutes that senior Djibril Thiam and sophomore Brian Gibson played together in the post against the Rebels, and that combination could see more minutes at San Diego State, especially to help in rebounding. Gibson’s specialty is rebounding, and is fourth on the team (3.3 rpg). His 27 offensive boards are the third-most on the team.